A streetcar named desire shmoop. SparkNotes: A Streetcar Named Desire: Plot Overview 2019-01-13

A streetcar named desire shmoop Rating: 5,3/10 1977 reviews

A Streetcar Named Desire

a streetcar named desire shmoop

Blanche is overcome by sickness; she cannot return to Laurel, and Stanley knows it. When the next scene begins, about one month has passed. She is immediately on the defensive as she describes how hard she worked to keep the plantation running, while Stella left to live her own life in New Orleans. Or was she just desperately trying to stay in character, desperately trying to save face? Speaking of sexuality, Streetcar was censored when it was converted to film, like another Williams play, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. You-ll find thought-provoking character analyses, quotes, summaries, themes, symbols, trivia, and lots of insightful commentary in Shmoop's literature guides. In this way, the play is a study of the mysteries of human… well, desire. Stanley and Blanche are characterized as polar opposites.

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A Streetcar Named Desire Summary

a streetcar named desire shmoop

She doesn't understand how Stella, who is expecting her first child, could have picked a husband so lacking in refinement. Alone, Blanche sits looking nervous and uncomfortable as she surveys the messy, dingy surroundings. Scene Four Summary The morning after the poker game, Stella lies serenely in the bedroom, her face aglow. Stella runs to Stanley and embraces him fiercely. Blanche simply cannot understand how a woman raised at Belle Reve could choose to live her life with such an ungentlemanly, brutish man. After the drink is poured, Blanche asks how Stella has allowed herself to stoop to such poor living conditions. A doctor and nurse come and take Blanche away to the asylum.


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A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

a streetcar named desire shmoop

As the scene ends, it is revealed that Blanche was married once, when she was young, but the boy died. Blanche becomes terrified to the point that she smashes a bottle on the table and threatens to smash Stanley in the face. Blanche proposes that Shep could provide money for she and Stella to escape and begins to compose a telegram to him. When she tries to step past him, he refuses to move out of her way. They are opposing camps and Stella is caught in no-man's-land. Blanche's flirtatious Southern-belle presence causes problems for Stella and Stanley, who already have a volatile relationship, leading to even greater conflict in the Kowalski household. These common themes appear to be autobiographical for Williams, who was raised in Tennessee hence the nickname and grew up gay in a homophobic society.


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A Streetcar Named Desire: Shmoop Study Guide by Shmoop

a streetcar named desire shmoop

Stella, Mitch and the landlady seem in agreement that Blanche is an innocent flower ravaged by wartime whom Stanley destroyed with his crude bullying. Later, he threatens Blanche with hints that he has heard rumors of her disreputable past. Blanche suggests that she and Stella contact a millionaire named Shep Huntleigh for help escaping from New Orleans; when Stella laughs at her, Blanche reveals that she is completely broke. Was she already losing her mind, or was it her rape by Stanley that finally unhinged her? Stanley immediately distrusts Blanche to the extent that he suspects her of having cheated Stella out of her share of the family inheritance. These characters are just like folks you know, which makes their struggles all the more haunting.


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SparkNotes: A Streetcar Named Desire: Scene Four

a streetcar named desire shmoop

A telling interlude has Stanley striking Stella for interfering with his treatment of Blanche. Blanche takes long baths, criticizes the squalor of the apartment, and irritates Stanley. Stanley enters the apartment with Mitch and Steve, all returning from bowling. Finally, the doctor approaches Blanche in a gentle manner and convinces her to leave with him. When Stanley re-enters the scene at the end, is he on the prowl and ready to strike, as Blanche suspects? A train approaches, and while it roars past Stanley enters the flat unheard. Stella is calm, peaceful, and glowing, as though still lit with some of the lurid kitchen lighting of the previous night. When Mitch -- a card-playing buddy of Stanley's -- arrives on the scene, Blanche begins to see a way out of her predicament.


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A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

a streetcar named desire shmoop

Shmoop on the Kindle is like having a trusted, fun, chatty, expert literature-tour-guide always by your side, no Take your understanding of A Streetcar Named Desire to a whole new level, anywhere you go: on a plane, on a mountain, in a canoe, under a tree. It is an evening in early May in the 1930s. When Blanche attracts the attention of lonely Mitch who sees the remnants of her Aristocratic upbringing, Stanley investigates, through a friend travelling in Mississippi, why his emotionally disturbed, alcoholic, child molesting sister-in-law was fired from her job and kicked out of her boarding house. Soon after the boy departs, Mitch arrives, and they go on their date. He is direct and blunt; she dances around every topic. Several hours later, Blanche, drunk, sits alone in the apartment.

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A Streetcar Named Desire Scene 1 Summary and Analysis

a streetcar named desire shmoop

Only desperation and a lack of other options has brought her to Elysian Fields, a tenement as different from its heavenly title as can be imagined by Blanche's sheltered mind. It opened in December of 1947 on Broadway and ran for over two full years, earning two Tony awards for the stage production and the. Eunice tells Blanche that she has come to the right place — Blanche's sister, Stella, lives on the first floor. Blanche is in the bath, and Stanley plays poker with his buddies in the front room. But Blanche herself has ridden Desire to arrive in New Orleans; in other words, her own lust has taken her to the end of the line. Research and analytics cookies These cookies help us understand user behavior within our services. The Kowalski apartment is in a poor but charming neighborhood in the French Quarter.

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A Streetcar Named Desire

a streetcar named desire shmoop

Blanche is greatly relieved to find Stella safe and sound. Blanche broaches the subject of the DuBois family plantation, Belle Reve. The recollection makes her feel sick, and she buries her head in her arms. He is brutish, coarse, primitive; she is dainty, elegant, delicate. Even though Blanche is horrified at the way Stanley treats Stella, her solution to get out of the situation also relies on a man.

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SparkNotes: A Streetcar Named Desire: Scene Four

a streetcar named desire shmoop

She also mentions that she has been given a leave of absence from her teaching position because of her bad nerves. Beyond finding Blanche's delicate hoidy-toidy act as putting on airs, Stanley, a plant worker, believes she may really have sold Belle Reve and is withholding Stella's fair share of the proceeds from them. As such, Blanche is in love with darkness throughout 1951. Stanley plays along, for now. Stanley's roughness bothers Blanche as well, since he makes no effort to be gentle with her.


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A Streetcar Named Desire Scene 4 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

a streetcar named desire shmoop

Mid-fight, she tells him to take her to the hospital - the baby is coming. These interactive study guides will help you discover and rediscover some of the greatest works of all time. Both plays include a gay man who, restricted by claustrophobic social boundaries in the 1940s and '50s, marries a woman. Stanley indicates to Blanche that he is aware of her past. Also important is the detailed description of the set. She also tells Mitch about her relationship with her late husband, which was like having the world bathed in a rich, white light. On Blanche's birthday, Mitch stands her up, abandoning her for good.

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